Nomad Destinations – Lost Nomad http://lostnomad.org/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 10:13:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://lostnomad.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/lost-nomad-icon-150x150.png Nomad Destinations – Lost Nomad http://lostnomad.org/ 32 32 This icy Norwegian island is ideal for digital nomads http://lostnomad.org/this-icy-norwegian-island-is-ideal-for-digital-nomads/ http://lostnomad.org/this-icy-norwegian-island-is-ideal-for-digital-nomads/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 12:00:25 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/this-icy-norwegian-island-is-ideal-for-digital-nomads/

London is famous for its history, culture and financial weight. But it’s not a great place to live if you’re a digital nomad.

The city scored an average 78e out of 100 in a ranking of remote work destinations published by Remote, a startup providing HR solutions for distributed teams.

But other European destinations have taken over, winning six of the top 10 slots. Perhaps the most surprising is Svalbard in Norway. The 3,000 inhabitants and 1,000 polar bears of the remote archipelago (No kidding) took sixth place, alongside Madrid [2nd], Madeira [4th], Helsinki [5th], Berlin [8th] and Dublin [9th].

“Alcohol is very expensive, but the cost of rent is relatively low.

Home to the world’s northernmost church, university and brewery, Svalbard is a place where “alcohol is very expensive but the cost of rent is relatively low,” says Job van der Voort, CEO and co-founder of Remote. It is also one of the few places in the world where anyone can live – citizens of any country are welcome to settle in Svalbard visa-free as long as they have a job and a place to live. .

At the other end of the scale is London. Despite a high score for openness to the diversity of lifestyles, safety and quality of life, the “overall score of the city [was] reduced due to the increased cost of living in the UK city compared to other global destinations, ”said Remote. Other European cities that performed poorly in the ranking include Budapest [79th], Bratislava [87th] and Warsaw [93rd].

The top 10 cities in total are: Toronto, Madrid, Auckland, Madeira, Helsinki, Svalbard, Berlin, Valparaiso, Dublin and Sydney. Salt Lake City claims 11e place, but U.S. cities are not listed higher due to strict immigration rules, van der Voort says.

The “most open-minded places” are Stockholm, Toronto and Amsterdam.

Technicians reassess life

The index comes at a time when tech workers are seeking to leave the big cities as they reassess work and life during the pandemic.

The survey ranks cities in all countries of the world for the quality of the Internet connection, attractiveness, security, quality of life, openness, cost of living and incentives for remote workers.

Auckland, Honolulu, Sydney and Reykjavík are among the top destinations offering the “best quality of life” for remote workers. The “most open-minded places” are Stockholm, Toronto and Amsterdam.

Italian Emilia Romagna has the greatest cash incentive for nomads.

A tool launched alongside the index allows users to measure the importance of these factors and generate a personalized list. If a user prioritizes the quality of the Internet connection, for example, the first destination becomes Madrid, while Bucharest and Copenhagen also rank in the top 10.

In total, the ranking counts 44 countries and 24 US states as having some special form of remote work incentive, in the form of digital nomadic visas, tax breaks, relocation payments or housing incentives.

Money or cattle

Nomadic patterns are notably different depending on where you are going. Aruba, an island in the Caribbean Sea, is awarded the Remote ranking for offering the best incentives to digital nomads through its “One Happy Workation” program.

Remote workers in Cabo Verde, on the other hand, are exempt from income tax, while the lowest monthly income requirement of any country, around £ 300, is offered by Ecuador.

Some cities want digital nomads to stay long term as part of a rejuvenation campaign. Emilia Romagna in Italy, for example, has the biggest cash incentive for nomads, paying parents under 40 almost £ 25,000 to relocate. Other cities, particularly dependent on tourism, now also offer visas for digital nomads who wish to extend their stay beyond six months.

But it’s Mishima in central Japan that has the strangest offer to woo nomads – the choice of a lump sum of around $ 2.7,000 or a calf.

Éanna Kelly is editor-in-chief at Sifted. He tweets from @ EannaKelly1.

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TBWA Future of Travel Report Predicts Greener, Smarter, Conscious Future http://lostnomad.org/tbwa-future-of-travel-report-predicts-greener-smarter-conscious-future/ http://lostnomad.org/tbwa-future-of-travel-report-predicts-greener-smarter-conscious-future/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:22:36 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/tbwa-future-of-travel-report-predicts-greener-smarter-conscious-future/

Backslash, the cultural intelligence unit of TBWA Worldwide, released its Future of Travel report.

The report is the third in Backslash’s “Future of” series, which explores what’s going on and, more importantly, what’s going on. should– then come in the categories not to be missed.

For decades, tourism has been defined by volume. Predictable routes and discount flights have attracted the masses, wreaking havoc on our dearest destinations and the people who live there. But as the world begins to book post-vaccination getaways, the report predicts a greener, smarter, and more intentional era of travel is upon us.

The report draws on cultural intelligence to unlock four disruptive travel growth opportunities and outlines specific ways for companies to take action, whether by reaching out to untapped audiences, introducing new services, or implementing new services. investing in product innovation.

  • Ta Great Redemption: An era of more attentive tourism will rebalance the scales, considering a place and its inhabitants as much as the traveler. Find out how anti-tourism, responsible restrictions and AI will reset the category.
  • Anchorless Living: As we move from one-off vacations to permanent trips, tourism businesses will be forced to respond to a changing life. Find out how telecommuting, nomadic concierges and flexible packages will pave the way for a new kind of business travel.
  • Travel inward: As travelers turn inward, routes will increasingly be built around the mind and body. Looking to the future, psychedelics, interactive dining experiences, and evidence-based amenities will be the markers of a truly transformative getaway.
  • Destination unknown: The pursuit of new frontiers will redefine travel aspirations. Find out how hedonistic escapes, end-of-the-world destinations, and the ability to create your own virtual adventures will bring back the magic of travel.

Agathe Guerrier, Director of Strategy at TBWA Worldwide, said: “The pandemic has changed business and leisure travel as we know it, and the time away from travel has shown us that we are ready for a reset.

“While travel volumes are expected to remain depressed for some time, there are many new opportunities for brands to add value to the category. As is often the case, the companies that help shape the future will be those that find their place there. “

Cecelia Girr, Director of Cultural Strategy at Backslash said: “The journey is at an inflection point. For decades we have enjoyed unlimited travel without much guilt, but we are finally realizing that mass tourism has consequences. So even though we book fewer trips in the future, the trips we take will be more intentional.

“And because of that, we’ll see companies start to focus on high volume to high value, which is a really encouraging turnaround,” said one.

The Future of Travel report was born out of months of in-depth qualitative and quantitative research, strategic ideation, and collaboration between 44 Culture Spotters from 26 global TBWA offices.

Our Spotters bring expertise from their work at some of the world’s largest travel agencies, from Hilton to Singapore Airlines to Tourism New Zealand.

The Future of Travel report can be downloaded at Backslash.com/FutureofTravel.

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Bryan Boice: How to respond to the phenomenon of business travel http://lostnomad.org/bryan-boice-how-to-respond-to-the-phenomenon-of-business-travel/ http://lostnomad.org/bryan-boice-how-to-respond-to-the-phenomenon-of-business-travel/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 18:16:14 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/bryan-boice-how-to-respond-to-the-phenomenon-of-business-travel/

Bryan Boice: How to respond to the phenomenon of business travel

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This may not be a new trend anymore, but remote working vacations or ‘workstations’ are one of the most important developments to come out of the COVID-19 pandemic for the travel industry. . In the space of a year, the concept of combining work and travel has grown from a novelty to a regular part of our travel plans. Many employers now trust their employees to work from anywhere and remote workers enjoy the flexibility of being able to live and work from a new location.

Property managers are now wondering how to capitalize on the phenomenon of work travel and how to attract more savvy clients to the workplace by finding ways to exploit what appears to be more than just a trend and increasing their income by getting longer term bookings. .

Based on some recent findings from a HomeToGo fall travel trends study, we take a closer look at workstations and share tips property managers should keep in mind ahead of the months. autumn and winter coming.

Update your digital nomad character

Many still feel that digital nomads may only be millennials or people working in the tech industry, but that is simply not the case. The definition has spanned all types of industries and demographics, including entire families, couples, and groups of friends living and working together from a vacation home.

In a recent study, HomeToGo found that 70% of American travelers plan to bring their work with them at least once on vacation this year. The percentage is also high for European markets, notably France (57%), Germany (52%) and the United Kingdom (50%), although, comparatively, Americans still live up to their stereotype. of hard work and without leave. .

Property managers looking to capitalize on the emergence of workstations should keep domestic and U.S. clientele on their radar and broaden their target guest personality, exploring distribution channels appealing to the broader definition of a digital nomad.

Encourage a change of scenery

Throughout the pandemic, many people felt stuck at home and missed their typical daily excitement and adventure. When offices and schools remained closed for the foreseeable future, many began to think about the possibilities of living and working in a different destination.

In terms of dream travel destinations, more than half of American travelers cited beach and mountain vacations as their trip of choice.

This has been the case for much of the past two years, as lakes, mountains and resort towns have been in the spotlight thanks to the rise of domestic travel and social distancing.

For property managers interested in the best growth markets this fall, charming places like Brown County, IN (+ 598%); The Hamptons, NY (+ 418%); Hocking Hills, OH (+ 345%) is among those with the largest year-over-year increase in search demand on HomeToGo.

There is hope for property managers in the markets still struggling to see a rebound in domestic clients. With the return of events, nightlife and international travel, urban destinations are also quickly getting back on track, in terms of traveler demand. HomeToGo searches for vacation rentals in urban areas are up + 29% from fall 2020 and that number is expected to increase as the United States reopens its borders to international travel.

To capitalize on the demand that exists for a change of scenery, property managers in urban markets need to focus on the type of community and the area where their property is located. Including photos of nearby sights and attractions will appeal to travelers looking for local experiences. All community restaurants, concert halls, and local markets should be prominently featured in listing descriptions.

Don’t overlook the details

Furniture sales and home improvement have exploded in recent years as people spend more time at home and prioritize their personal comfort and space. The same trend also applies to travelers who prioritize the comforts of home in their travel accommodations.

Fortunately, vacation rentals already have a big advantage over other types of accommodation when it comes to extra space, as well as these types of amenities. When asked what type of accommodation they would choose for a remote working vacation, nearly half of U.S. respondents said they would book a vacation home (47%) rather than any other type of accommodation. .

Source: HomeToGo survey. Research conducted by HomeToGo with a sample of 1000 respondents in the United States, with a confidence level of 95%. To participate in this survey, respondents had to be 18 years of age or older. The survey was conducted online from August 26 to 29, 2021.

When observing long-term (20+ days) customer search behaviors, the most requested amenities include:

  • accepted animals
  • the Internet
  • Pool
  • Washing machine
  • Food

Property managers looking to better cater to long-term travelers should focus on the special amenities of their properties; even seemingly mundane items like coffee machines or blackout curtains could be obstacles for some guests.

It is also important to be precise with internet speeds. Screenshots of a property’s upload and download speeds are starting to appear alongside images more often, along with messages on dedicated workspaces and private areas of the home to take calls.

All of this to say that workstations present a huge opportunity for property managers to secure longer term, off-season bookings. However, in order to cater for the growing number of digital nomads, property managers need to pay special attention to the amenities they offer, creating a space where they themselves would like to live and work.

]]> http://lostnomad.org/bryan-boice-how-to-respond-to-the-phenomenon-of-business-travel/feed/ 0 Omnicom: TBWA’s Future Of Travel Report Explores Travel Inflection Point http://lostnomad.org/omnicom-tbwas-future-of-travel-report-explores-travel-inflection-point/ http://lostnomad.org/omnicom-tbwas-future-of-travel-report-explores-travel-inflection-point/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 17:11:03 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/omnicom-tbwas-future-of-travel-report-explores-travel-inflection-point/

LOS ANGELES, October 5, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Backslash, the cultural intelligence unit of TBWA Worldwide, has released its Future of Travel report. The report is the third in Backslash’s “Future of” series, which explores what will – and more importantly, what should – come next in must-see categories.

For decades, tourism has been defined by volume. Predictable routes and discount flights have attracted the masses, wreaking havoc on our dearest destinations and the people who live there. But as the world begins to book post-vaccination getaways, the report predicts a greener, smarter, and more intentional era of travel is upon us.

“The pandemic has changed business and leisure travel as we know it, and time away from travel has shown us that we are ready for a reset,” said Agathe Warrior, Strategy Director, TBWA Worldwide. “While travel volumes are expected to remain depressed for some time, there are many new opportunities for brands to add value to the category. As is often the case, the companies that help shape the future will be those that find their place there. . “

The report draws on cultural intelligence to unlock four disruptive travel growth opportunities and outlines specific ways for companies to take action, whether by reaching out to untapped audiences, introducing new services, or implementing new services. investing in product innovation.

  1. The Great Redemption: A more attentive era of tourism will rebalance the scales, considering a place and its inhabitants as much as the traveler. Find out how anti-tourism, responsible restrictions and AI will reset the category.
  2. Living without an anchor: As we move from one-off vacations to permanent trips, tourism businesses will be forced to adapt to a changing life. Find out how telecommuting, nomadic concierges and flexible packages will pave the way for a new kind of business travel.
  3. The tour of the journey to the interior: As travelers withdraw into themselves, routes will increasingly be built around the mind and body. Looking to the future, psychedelics, interactive dining experiences, and evidence-based amenities will be the markers of a truly transformative getaway.
  4. Destination unknown: The pursuit of new frontiers will redefine travel aspirations. Find out how hedonistic escapes, end-of-the-world destinations, and the ability to create your own virtual adventures will bring back the magic of travel.

“Travel is at an inflection point. For decades we have enjoyed unlimited travel without too much guilt, but we are finally realizing that mass tourism has consequences. So even though we may be booking less than trips in the future, the trips we take will be more intentional. And because of that we will see companies start to focus on high volume towards high value, which is a very promising turnaround, ”added Cecelia Girr, director of cultural strategy at Backslash.

The Future of Travel report was born out of months of in-depth qualitative and quantitative research, strategic ideation, and collaboration between 44 Culture Spotters from 26 global TBWA offices. Our Spotters bring expertise from their work at some of the world’s largest travel agencies, from Hilton to Singapore Airlines to Tourism New Zealand.

The Future of Travel Report can be downloaded at https://www.backslash.com/futureoftravel.

About the backslash
Backslash is a cultural intelligence unit powered by a global network of over 300 Culture Spotters from 70 offices through the TBWA collective. Backslash closely observes and analyzes global developments so that TBWA – and its clients – can better understand and anticipate cultural changes. Through a dynamic hybrid of strategy, data and journalism, Backslash turns the stories of today into the opportunities of tomorrow. For more information on Backslash, follow us on Instagram at @TBWABackslash or visit www.backslash.com.

About TBWA in the world
TBWA is The Disruption® Company. We use creativity to help businesses challenge the status quo and seize an unfair part of the future. Named one of the most innovative companies in the world by Fast business in 2021, 2020 and 2019, and Pub weekGlobal Agency of the Year 2018, we are a creative company that uses Disruption® brand methodologies to help businesses meet their challenges and achieve transformative growth. Our collective has 11,300 creative minds in 275 offices in 95 countries and also includes brands such as Audience, Digital Arts Network (DAN), eg + worldwide, GMR, The Integer Group®, TBWA Media Arts Lab, TBWA WorldHealth and TRO. Global customers include adidas, Apple, Gatorade, Henkel, Hilton Hotels, McDonald’s, Nissan and Singapore Airlines. follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram, and like us on Facebook. TBWA is part of the Omnicom group (NYSE: OMC).

Cision

View original content to download multimedia: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/tbwas-future-of-travel-report-explores-travels-inflection-point-301393285.html

SOURCE TBWA in the world

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TBWA Future of Travel Report Explores Travel Inflection Point http://lostnomad.org/tbwa-future-of-travel-report-explores-travel-inflection-point/ http://lostnomad.org/tbwa-future-of-travel-report-explores-travel-inflection-point/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 17:10:00 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/tbwa-future-of-travel-report-explores-travel-inflection-point/

The era of unlimited travel and cut-and-paste itineraries is coming to an end. As the category aims to rebalance itself, companies will be forced to move from high volume to high value.

LOS ANGELES, October 5, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Backslash, the cultural intelligence unit of TBWA Worldwide, has released its Future of Travel report. The report is the third in Backslash’s “Future of” series, which explores what will – and more importantly, what should – come next in must-see categories.

backslash

For decades, tourism has been defined by volume. Predictable routes and discount flights have drawn the masses in, taking a catastrophic toll on our dearest destinations and the people who live there. But as the world begins to book post-vaccination getaways, the report predicts that a greener, smarter and more intentional era of travel is upon us.

“The pandemic has changed business and leisure travel as we know it, and time away from travel has shown us that we are ready for a reset,” said Agathe Warrior, Strategy Director, TBWA Worldwide. “While travel volumes are expected to remain depressed for some time, there are many new opportunities for brands to add value to the category. As is often the case, the companies that help shape the future will be those that find their place there. . “

The report draws on cultural intelligence to unlock four disruptive travel growth opportunities and outlines specific ways for companies to take action, whether by reaching out to untapped audiences, introducing new services, or implementing new services. investing in product innovation.

  1. The Great Redemption: A more attentive era of tourism will rebalance the scales, considering a place and its inhabitants as much as the traveler. Find out how anti-tourism, responsible restrictions and AI will reset the category.

  2. Living without an anchor: As we move from one-off vacations to permanent trips, tourism businesses will be forced to adapt to a changing life. Find out how telecommuting, nomadic concierges and flexible packages will pave the way for a new kind of business travel.

  3. The tour of the journey to the interior: As travelers withdraw into themselves, routes will increasingly be built around the mind and body. Looking to the future, psychedelics, interactive dining experiences, and evidence-based amenities will be the markers of a truly transformative getaway.

  4. Destination unknown: The pursuit of new frontiers will redefine travel aspirations. Find out how hedonistic escapes, end-of-the-world destinations, and the ability to create your own virtual adventures will bring back the magic of travel.

“Travel is at an inflection point. For decades we have enjoyed unlimited travel without too much guilt, but we are finally realizing that mass tourism has consequences. So even though we may be booking less than trips in the future, the trips we take will be more intentional. And because of that we will see companies start to focus on high volume towards high value, which is a very promising turnaround, ”added Cecelia Girr, director of cultural strategy at Backslash.

The Future of Travel report was born out of months of in-depth qualitative and quantitative research, strategic ideation, and collaboration between 44 Culture Spotters from 26 global TBWA offices. Our Spotters bring expertise from their work at some of the world’s largest travel agencies, from Hilton to Singapore Airlines to Tourism New Zealand.

The Future of Travel Report can be downloaded at https://www.backslash.com/futureoftravel.

About the backslash
Backslash is a cultural intelligence unit powered by a global network of over 300 Culture Spotters from 70 offices through the TBWA collective. Backslash closely observes and analyzes global developments so that TBWA – and its clients – can better understand and anticipate cultural changes. Through a dynamic hybrid of strategy, data and journalism, Backslash turns the stories of today into the opportunities of tomorrow. For more information on Backslash, follow us on Instagram at @TBWABackslash or visit www.backslash.com.

About TBWA in the world
TBWA is The Disruption® Company. We use creativity to help businesses challenge the status quo and seize an unfair part of the future. Named one of the most innovative companies in the world by Fast business in 2021, 2020 and 2019, and Pub weekGlobal Agency of the Year 2018, we are a creative company that uses Disruption® brand methodologies to help businesses meet their challenges and achieve transformative growth. Our collective has 11,300 creative minds in 275 offices in 95 countries and also includes brands such as Audience, Digital Arts Network (DAN), eg + worldwide, GMR, The Integer Group®, TBWA Media Arts Lab, TBWA WorldHealth and TRO. Global customers include adidas, Apple, Gatorade, Henkel, Hilton Hotels, McDonald’s, Nissan and Singapore Airlines. follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram, and like us on Facebook. TBWA is part of the Omnicom group (NYSE: OMC).

Cision

Cision

View original content to download multimedia: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/tbwas-future-of-travel-report-explores-travels-inflection-point-301393285.html

SOURCE TBWA in the world

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Lively! Tour representative interview http://lostnomad.org/lively-tour-representative-interview/ http://lostnomad.org/lively-tour-representative-interview/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 07:50:33 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/lively-tour-representative-interview/

October 4, 2021 – As the Adriatic coast slowly prepares for its winter tourism hibernation, some fascinating information from a representative of the UK in the 1980s, a time when Croatian winter tourism was very much alive. Would it still be?

There have been many heated debates on social media in response to TCN’s latest editorial this weekend – Could digital nomad concepts solve the problem of Croatian winter tourism?

While Croatia has excellent tourism figures in summer, the Adriatic coast is almost closed in winter, with an impact not only on its tourist offer, but also on the quality of life of local residents. Recent digital nomad concepts such as Nomad Table – inviting digital nomads to meet and interact over dinner – fills a restaurant in Split once a week; an evening of meeting and pitching in Zagreb offers entertainment for 50 inhabitants, expatriates and nomads; and the new Digital Nomad Valley Zagreb co-living concept already has more than 50 applications in just 5 days for the winter.

None of these ideas are revolutionary, all are transferable to mainstream tourism. So, is it time to work on a strategic plan for a pilot project on a quality destination like Split?

Of the many reactions on social media, this particular comment caught my attention.

The Amfora and now Riva in the town of Hvar were open all winter as well as a few restaurants and cafes catering mainly to American tourists for walking, history and the arts. That was until 1991.

The comment was made by Martin Gannon, a Briton with his heart in Jelsa on Hvar. Martin worked as an operations manager for Pilgrim Holidays, which was owned by Yugoslav airline JAT from 1986 to 1991. He told me he was busy with tourists 12 months a year covering Dubrovnik, Split, Hvar, Pula, Zagreb, as well as other destinations in the former Yugoslavia.

And there were plenty of thefts. This, at a time before the revolution of low-cost flights. Martin kindly accepted an email interview to tell us more about winter tourism as it once was.

1. Croatian tourism is very seasonal, with most of the tourism in the summer months and almost nothing in the winter months. But that was not always the case. You were director of operations for Pilgrim Holidays, owned by the Yugoslav airline JAT from 1986 to 1991. Tell us about winter tourism at the time.

When I started working for Pilgrim Holidays, which was then part of JAT, we had a large fleet of planes. Being a self-managed business (a type of worker cooperative similar to Waitrose, John Lewis in the UK), it was not possible to shut down services or have staff with short-term contracts that they only worked in the summer. were found to keep personnel employed and aircraft to continue operating. Yes, services have been reduced compared to the summer, but you can still get direct flights from the UK to Zagreb, Dubrovnik and Split, with connections to Pula and Zadar.

My role was to see how to increase visitor traffic from the UK to the former Yugoslavia.

At the time, Yugotours America was successfully bringing tourists from New York on regular DC10 services via Belgrade and Zagreb, staying in Dubrovnik Split and Hvar.

Tourists have also come via UK operator Saga Holidays on coach tours from Vienna to Dubrovnik. I worked for Saga Holidays from 1980 to 1983, leading coach tours of Americans and British tourists who were elderly.

With a good number of hotels open, I started to develop short winter breaks, better known nowadays as city breaks. Event tourism in the form of conferences for large companies also took place. Surprisingly for a country during socialist times, religious events such as the St. Blaise festival in February in Dubrovnik and the developing religious destination Medjugorje have been promoted and visited. At the time JAT had a lot of international flights to India, America, China and Australia so I arranged an option to add a few days. So instead of flying from London via Zagreb or Belgrade directly to Sydney, you can stay in Split or Dubrovnik for a few days cheaply.

I also started to develop health tourism, spas, dental care and even some ski and adventure vacations, as well as wildlife viewing, especially in early spring.

2. It was a time before the low cost airline revolution. Tell us about the off-season flights to the Croatian coast. Who flew where and how often?

Air operations were first operated in the low tourist season by Yugoslav Airlines and Inex-Adria (now Adria). JAT operated mainly to Zagreb and Belgrade from London, Manchester and Glasgow. There were also direct flights to Ljubljana (for skiing) Dubrovnik and Split, as well as numerous connecting flights to the coast from Belgrade and Zagreb. Inex-Adria operated from Manchester and Gatwick to Ljubljana and Maribor for a ski vacation.

The other airline Aviogenex owned by Yugotours operated from Gatwick to a number of Serbian airports for ski vacations as well as charter services for conferences, mainly to Dubrovnik, where 200-300 delegates would be flown, to the support from JAT where we could only supply one aircraft.

3. What was the profile of the winter tourist in Croatia? Which nationalities were the biggest visitors?

The main off-season visitors were Americans, as well as pilgrims from Medjugorje, mainly Irish and Spanish. We also transported a very large number of Filipinos going mainly to Medjugorje, so we participated in accommodation and transfers. Americans were mostly retirees and interested in history, the arts, and food. These would be organized in groups, and in the town of Hvar, the old theater was used to present performances in English, of actors from all over Yugoslavia at the time.

4. What were the most popular destinations? It’s hard to imagine Pula, Split, Dubrovnik and Hvar as 12 month destinations.

The main destinations were Dubrovnik and Split, with additions to Pula and Opatija, as well as Plitvice (although it was mostly in the spring). Unfortunately Croatia is not well known for skiing although it does have some, so sales were for Slovenia, and the Serbian resort of Kopaonik for ski holidays, ski week in the mountains and then a few days or more. on the coast.

5. Swimming in winter is only for diehards in Croatia. What were these tourists doing during their winter visits?

The hotels used during the winter had indoor pools, and even some had limited spa facilities, so people enjoyed limited walking, history and sporting activities. The majority of these visitors were older and would take advantage of milder coastal conditions. They would not stay for a week, but up to 6 weeks or more, as it was cheaper then to stay in the hotel than to pay the food and heating bills at home, in the UK or in the US. United.

You have to remember that it was a socialist era, so no one could be unemployed. Better to run the hotel at a small cost than to have staff, in the hope that tourists would buy extra drinks, massages etc. to cover additional costs.

(Martin Gannon, left, taking a coffee break with his father in Jelsa in the 1980s)

6. Take the town of Hvar as an example. What was open in terms of hotels, restaurants and other tourist facilities?

The town of Hvar opened the Amfora hotel, which had an excellent indoor swimming pool, a medical center and a health center specializing in lung, respiratory and asthma conditions. There was also a fitness team, which helped visiting sports teams, such as water polo, football teams in training. And basically anyone who needs sports fitness advice.

Hotel Slavija (now Riva) was also open, but mainly for domestic tourism. A few restaurants and coffee bars were open, again most of them were not private, a few were. All museums and theaters were open and fully operational. Boat trips were of course not held in winter.

7. The homeland war obviously changed everything. But with such a global tourism boom 30 years later, why do you think Croatia no longer has the winter tourism it had in the 1980s? What changed?

The main reason Croatia has low tourism is poor connectivity with flights, but this now has an opportunity to change with Ryanair showing up in Zagreb. But there are still few domestic flights during the winter. There is also a serious lack of showing opportunities to visit Croatia out of season and keeping hotels open. And reasonable prices and marketing. It doesn’t have to be a large number of people coming, but people who are willing to pay well and have fun.

8. We will appoint you Croatian Minister of Tourism for this matter. Considering your experience with tourism then and the world today, what steps would you take to reintroduce 12 month tourism to Croatia?

Take a much better look at marketing Croatia, showing off its breathtaking landscapes. People are no longer just looking for the sun and the sea; they want something, especially in winter, to challenge them, entertain them, enjoy healthy food and wine and craft beers. It is better to see and visit them in winter than in summer when it is almost 40 degrees !!

Many hotels have good sports facilities, so invite football teams from all over Europe to train, as they did before, as well as water polo teams. A popular sport now is swimming in cold water, many exciting rivers in Croatia to attempt this challenge. Healthy food yoga vacations, spas, medical tourism, especially dental care, and yes, skiing outside of Zagreb.

Maybe not so much now after Covid but companies will still have conferences, so do them good business, the delegates will come back themselves with their families when they see how beautiful Croatia is. I know this is a fact, as I used to book delegates for our summer vacation when I was in Pilgrim.

Nature tours, environmental train rides. Working holidays, helps to plant trees in burnt areas. Projects to help rebuild areas damaged by earthquakes, some of these ideas will be aimed at small groups but they are high value tourists and most importantly they will visit again and tweet and take a snapshot of what they do, by getting free publicity.

Interesting things, thank you Martin. If anyone else has any memories or contribution to Croatian winter tourism as it once was, please contact us at This e-mail address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Subject Winter tourism.

Martin has already contributed to TCN with a very interesting tale of restarting tourism after the Homeland War, a different time. For more, see Reviving Croatian Tourism from the UK After the Homeland War: A Travel Agent’s Story.

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Could digital nomad concepts solve the problem of winter tourism in Croatia? http://lostnomad.org/could-digital-nomad-concepts-solve-the-problem-of-winter-tourism-in-croatia/ http://lostnomad.org/could-digital-nomad-concepts-solve-the-problem-of-winter-tourism-in-croatia/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 17:35:54 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/could-digital-nomad-concepts-solve-the-problem-of-winter-tourism-in-croatia/

October 2, 2021 – Community, events, co-living – how concepts for digital nomads can be used to improve the problem of winter tourism in Croatia.

Let me start by explaining the background to my perspective on Croatian winter tourism.

Having lived full time for 13 years on the island of Hvar, I have seen the realities of Croatian tourism seasonality more closely than most. An idyllic island to live in for sure, but with locals too busy with the season to fully enjoy the summer months, only to then meet the long and beautiful winter with everything closed and nowhere to go. With so much more to offer than sun, sea and beach, it has always been a mystery to me why Croatia has not been able to develop year round tourism.

As a local resident in the winter with all restaurants in town closed for 5 months of the year, the announcement of ANY event and the opportunity to go socialize was gratefully accepted by many locals. Something different to break the daily routine of coffee visits, work in the fields and walks along the coast. I used to watch the few tourists who came during the winter months – a time when Hvar, at least to me, was even more beautiful than in summer – and how lost they looked. With so few places open, it was difficult to find a place to eat, things to do, people to meet.

And it wasn’t just Hvar. The Dalmatian coastal towns in winter are a shadow of themselves in summer in terms of life. This is the classic story of the chicken and the egg. A lot of businesses want tourists all year round, but they couldn’t afford to stay open in the hope that they show up. Many tourists would like to come in the off season – Sandinavians escape a harsh winter, for example – but the air connections were very poor. And for those who managed to visit, there was simply no focal point or events to attend, or ways to connect with other tourists.

But while there was better connectivity, a decent schedule with a selection of restaurants and other hospitality services available year-round, as well as focal points to meet both locals and fellow travelers, some Could Croatia’s coastal destinations extend their season, or even operate 12 months a year?

I think they could, and I think there are various initiatives of the digital nomad community that provide some useful insight on how we can tackle this winter tourism problem in Croatia.

In the winter of 2019, Saltwater Nomads, based in Split, one of the city’s premier coworking spaces, was receiving good deals from nomads who came to use their services. But nomads not only want a place to work, but also a social life. Saltwater Nomads has partnered with local restaurants Zinfandel and Brasserie on 7 to deliver a weekly concept called Nomad Table. For a fixed price for a 3-course meal, Nomad Table was advertised on nomadic and expat social media platforms. It was a total success, sold out every week and was becoming an integral part of Split’s off-season tourist scene, until a certain pandemic disrupted matters.

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Yesterday evening, at the Canopy by Hilton hotel in Zagreb, the ambassador of the digital nomad of Zagreb in September, the Israeli Nimrod Dean Kuchel, organized a meeting and presentation evening in Zagreb. it was a simple social evening, open to all and promoted through TCN and some nomadic social media groups. A pledge of 5 speakers talking about their travel / digital nomad experiences followed by a social evening of chat and networking.

About fifty people showed up, a mixture of locals, expatriates and nomads. The 5 announced speakers quickly turned into 10 as people in the audience wanted to share their stories as well. New friendships were formed, new events were discovered, many going to Ivanic-Grad today for the Bucijada Pumpkin Festival. A simple concept with a wide appeal.

Earlier this week, TCN shared with you the story of Croatia’s first digital nomadic village, Digital Nomad Valley Zadar. This is the first creative use for digital nomadic purposes of the abundant tourist accommodation that is largely unused during the winter months. The concept is simple: to provide people with a spectacular location, with many facilities, including a community and a good co-working space, and to offer events and activities.

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Launched three days ago, Digital Nomad Valley Zadar already has 25 nomads who have registered to stay when it opens in 8 days on October 10.

A weekly nomadic table in Split, an evening over drinks with travelogues in Zagreb and a creative use of a campsite and hotel in the low season. Nothing revolutionary, and nothing too complicated to organize or reproduce. But quite a success, and with applications beyond simple digital nomads.

As I can attest from my stay in Hvar, the benefits of successful Croatian winter tourism would not only be for the tourism sector, but for the population as a whole. If certain tourist traffic made it possible to open a few more restaurants or other businesses throughout the year, and if these tourist arrivals involved the addition of events during the winter months, not only would money go into it. economy, but the quality of life of local populations would also improve.

But how do you deal with this chicken and this egg?

I would try a pilot project in a destination that has the potential to be a year round destination with a lot of content outside of the sun and the sea.

A destination like Split.

Ten restaurants, 2-3 hotels, a few travel agencies to start with. Use the creative ideas above and adapt them to winter tourism. Perhaps an emphasis on active tourism or perhaps gastronomic tourism. Wine tours don’t depend so much on the season, for example. Hiring good winegrowers and restaurateurs to come up with a gastronomic extravaganza could be a real success.

The islands are fabulous to visit any time of the year. Organized tourism in Europe began in Hvar with an emphasis on its temperate winter climate with the founding of the Hvar Health Society. Take the winegrowers, a few restaurants and activity tourism specialists aboard each island to offer a limited but quality product that will bring the island to life for its visitors.

Talk to the airlines. A longer season is in their best interests, and if they can have the first-mover advantage to make it happen, maybe that’s an added incentive. With Ryanair now serving multiple destinations during the winter from Zagreb, would it be too difficult / expensive to see what can be done for Split?

A concerted effort and a focused strategy to deliver a rich and targeted tourism offering for the pilot program should not be difficult to conceive for a country where more than 20% of its GDP comes from tourism, and the rewards of a successful pilot could. be substantial, both in terms of quality of life and income. If a few progressive private sector entrepreneurs can organize things on a small scale like in the examples above, what could be done with a concerted official campaign?

For more information and views on Croatian tourism, follow the dedicated TCN section.

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The best new cocktail destinations in the world http://lostnomad.org/the-best-new-cocktail-destinations-in-the-world/ http://lostnomad.org/the-best-new-cocktail-destinations-in-the-world/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 12:00:00 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/the-best-new-cocktail-destinations-in-the-world/ The pandemic has not been kind to cocktail bars and the aficionados who frequent them. But as the world’s top destinations reopen to visitors, there are a plethora of long-awaited bars and lounges eager to serve up next-level libations, with a side of top-notch hospitality that prompts guests to order a second round.

Here’s a look at some of the latest notable bars and lounges to appear on the international cocktail circuit. Some have seen their launches delayed or delayed due to the global pandemic, and each is navigating through evolving health and safety protocols.

EUROPE

Led by internationally renowned mixologists Simone Caporale and Marc Álvarez, Sips seeks to disrupt the Barcelona cocktail scene with an ambitious approach that blends the art of classic cocktails with the latest technologies and trends. A masticating machine is used to blend the aromas and ingredients with surprising results – an espresso martini contains “coffee air” whipped with incense – and vessels designed by glass artists for each cocktail. Defying the limits of a conventional cocktail experience, Caporale and Álvarez have chosen not to incorporate a physical bar as a central element, thereby eliminating barriers between guests and bartenders.

Two of the most decorated bartenders in the Netherlands, Tess Posthumus and Timo Janse, have opened their second location in Amsterdam, Dutch Courage, focused on gin (traditional Dutch gin), offering over 150 different bottles and a huge range of cocktails. made from juniper. .

One of the trendiest new bars in Paris can be found near the shadow of the Arc de Triomphe, hidden behind a secret door in the recently renovated Hotel Barrière Le Fouquet’s. Le Marta Paris offers a sexy atmosphere for delicious designer drinks. The upstairs Rooftop Marta is open during the summer, with orange trees and Italian finger foods.

Le Marta Paris offers a sexy atmosphere for delicious designer drinks.

Le Fouquet’s

One of New York’s most decorated cocktail addresses, NoMad Hotel has opened its first international property in a historic building in the heart of London’s vibrant Covent Garden. NoMad New York veteran, Bar Manager Pietro Collina oversees bar programs across all venues, the main one being NoMad Restaurant. Located in the glass-ceilinged atrium, the restaurant’s cocktail list juxtaposes traditional drinks to NoMad’s favorites and a new selection of concoctions focused on London’s seasonality. Side Hustle also draws crowds; The NoMad version of a classic British pub can be found in the building’s old police station.

UNITED STATES

Los Angeles’ most popular new spot for next-level cocktails is a New York City import, and a notable one at that. Death & Co, one of the most influential and creative cocktail bars of this century, has opened its first West Coast outpost in the vibrant arts district of downtown LA. As with the original New York City location, the small, dimly lit spot doesn’t take reservations, giving patrons time to choose between the incredibly creative concoctions on offer and to learn about new techniques and obscure ingredients. .

Manhattan’s Dante, a welcoming haunt serving fine cocktails in a historic and renovated Greenwich Village setting, has won numerous global accolades in recent years. The Australian couple behind Dante, Linden Pride and Nathalie Hudson, have opened their first branch, Dante West Village a few blocks away. Located on the quaint corner of Hudson and Perry Streets, the mint-colored space features a hand-carved marble bar, with green velvet banquets, vintage lighting, and custom wallpaper. The list of Italian-accented libations includes Instagram-ready appetizers and martinis served in stylish glassware, trendy spritzes, and perfect negronis.

Dante West Village.

Giada Paoloni

Located in Prospect Heights in Brooklyn, Bar Goto Niban is Kenta Goto’s second business after the success of her Lower East Side cocktail bar, Bar Goto. The newer and more spacious outpost (niban means “second” in Japanese) follows in the footsteps of the original – a former winner of Enjoy your meal “Bar of the Year” —with an emphasis on Goto’s Japanese-inspired drinks. The beautiful space features walnut woodwork and a gorgeous Japanese garden spanning nearly 40 feet behind the bar, for sipping a meticulously crafted sakura martini, plum sazerac or sesame milk punch, and a notable assortment of Japanese sake and shochu is also on offer.

ASIA

The Ritz-Carlton, Millenia Singapore’s newest Republic Bar, is in the newly renovated east wing of the hotel, which was designed by New York-based Tonychi Studio. Inspired by the 1960s, the extensive cocktail menu is devoted to a tale of historical and cultural anecdotes from Singapore, the United Kingdom, Italy and the United States. There is also a selection of 1960s spirits and cocktails, and this being the Ritz, an opulent British-inspired afternoon tea experience is hosted daily.

Located in Bangkok’s new ultra-luxury Four Seasons hotel on the Chao Phraya River, BKK Social Club is the latest project from famed bar manager Philip Bischoff. Designed by New York-based company AvroKo, the attractive space transports a well-dressed mix of locals and visitors to Buenos Aires, as Bischoff and his team have infused Argentinian-inspired offerings with Thai flourishes.

The Diplomat bar team, Hong Kong.

Courtesy of The Diplomat, Hong Kong

Award-winning mixologist (and Seattle-native) John Nugent’s first sweatshop concept, The Diplomat opened in Hong Kong’s H Code, a lifestyle-savvy resort. Eclectic artwork by Ryan McGinley and Josh Sperling adds color and panache to the 18-seat hideaway, where the sleek interior includes brown leather banquettes, patterned ceiling tiles, and custom brass finishes. The drink menu includes a range of mini martinis, from Gibsons to tuxedos, and variations of modern classics such as an espresso martini with baijiu for added depth. A lucky few have access to the Diplomat’s Back Room, where there’s a DJ on the decks, a button on the table that says “Press For Champagne,” and a strict no cameras policy.

AUSTRALIA

The trio behind Maybe Sammy, one of Australia’s most decorated cocktail destinations to debut in recent years, opened Sammy Junior just steps away in Sydney’s central business district. The Sweet Brother, which starts off on weekdays as an espresso bar with bespoke coffee blends and classic breakfast bites, transforms into a cozy afternoon cocktail destination, especially on Friday after work, when live jazz is the highlight of a weekly aperitif session. . Smooth bottled cocktails include negroni jasmine and eucalyptus tendril, available in mini (100ml) and large (500ml).

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Do you want to work remotely? The first digital nomadic village opened in Croatia http://lostnomad.org/do-you-want-to-work-remotely-the-first-digital-nomadic-village-opened-in-croatia/ http://lostnomad.org/do-you-want-to-work-remotely-the-first-digital-nomadic-village-opened-in-croatia/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 11:00:48 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/do-you-want-to-work-remotely-the-first-digital-nomadic-village-opened-in-croatia/

A new village in Croatia has been launched, aimed specifically at digital nomads who want to leave the office.

Zadar is a port city in central Croatia. With thriving markets, sparkling beaches and all the fresh seafood you can get your hands on, this is the perfect place for a relaxing summer vacation.

But what if you don’t need to leave at the end of your vacation?

Due to the pandemic, remote working has gone from being a fringe idea to reality for many people. And many workers do not want to give up their new freedoms.

The digital nomadic lifestyle is ideal if you need a break from your usual workplace or want to engage in this lifestyle full time.

Studies show that flexible working has huge benefits for our mental and physical health. And if you’re in a location with a lower cost of living, your wallet could benefit as well.

Croatia was quick to recognize the digital nomadic lifestyle. As one of Europe’s largest travel destinations, they have relied on digital nomads to keep their economy running throughout the pandemic.

The country even offered special visas for digital nomads outside the EU, allowing them to stay for a year without paying income tax.

The specialized digital nomad village of Zadar

In Bokir, a district a few steps from the historic center of Zadar is the brand new Digital Nomad Valley Zadar. Or as it is affectionately called, ‘The Valley’.

The region is the first organized digital nomadic village in Croatia. It will officially open on October 10.

The Valley offers pretty houses that you can experience solo or with other community members. You have access to an exclusive coworking space and to events organized by the village.

Stays start at € 130 per week for a minimum of two weeks at a time. That’s € 520 for four weeks, significantly less than the average rent for an apartment in most of Europe.

Who is behind the village?

The Valley is the brainchild of Mario Mrksa, CEO of grabAhome, an apartment reservation service in Croatia.

“We chose the name ‘The Valley’ because people associate it with entrepreneurship, like Silicon Valley,” Mrksa told Euronews Travel.

“As many digital nomads are entrepreneurs and work for themselves, we want to create networking events and conferences on entrepreneurship, and also involve the local community. There are a lot of serious entrepreneurs who live a nomadic lifestyle, and we want to attract them to our cause.

“One of the reasons why we wanted to make this project a reality is that Croatian tourism largely depends on the summer season, while for the rest of the season many islands and towns are, as they say in Croatia, “Dead”.

“We see Zadar as a pilot project, but we really want to create several communities like this across the country to help small towns and villages boost their economies,” said Mrska.

Why Zadar?

Zadar has a rich history as the oldest permanently inhabited city in Croatia. A Liburnian colony absorbed by the Roman Empire, Zadar became part of the Republic of Croatia in 1991 during the Yugoslav War.

Since the end of the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, Zadar has once again become the center of the county and has seen large investments in Infrastructure, including the construction of the port of Gaženica and the establishment of the University of Zadar.

“Zadar is one of the most progressive cities in Croatia with a lot of students and young people, so it’s a very good mix of history and innovation,” Mrksa adds.

It is now home to a vibrant nightlife and a delicious restaurant scene.

The dishes you must try in Zadar include the nation’s favorite black risotto. Colored with squid ink, this seafood dish packs an intense punch that will stain your lips and stay etched in your memory.

And what better with a black risotto than a crisp, crisp wine like a Croatian Malvazija? With notes of fruit and citrus, this will set you up well for another day of work in sunny Zadar.

Need more conviction? Zadar was elected Best destination in Europe in 2016.

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Why Europe is a great place for digital nomads http://lostnomad.org/why-europe-is-a-great-place-for-digital-nomads/ http://lostnomad.org/why-europe-is-a-great-place-for-digital-nomads/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 17:10:30 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/why-europe-is-a-great-place-for-digital-nomads/